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FBI sends out warning about scam targeting college job seekers

Tuesday, OSU police sent out a warning from the FBI via Twitter, warning students about phony job offers on college websites and some school accounts from across the country. (WSYX/WTTE)

OSU senior Stephanie Hanson checks twice before taking any job offer that seems to good to be true.

That's good advice according to the FBI after sending out a warning about a scam targeting college students across the country.

"It's ridiculous. It's super cruel to target a 20-year-old college student like me," Hanson said.

Tuesday, OSU police sent out a warning from the FBI via Twitter, warning students about phony job offers on college websites and some school accounts from across the country.

The FBI says scam artists post jobs looking for students for administrative positions. They say they receive counterfeit checks in the mail and are then asked to deposit them in their personal accounts. From there, the scammer directs students to withdraw funds from their account, send a portion via wire transfer to another person for materials or software deemed vital for the job.

However, the checks are then determined to be fraudulent by the bank.

FBI investigators say while they've had no reports of any victims at any central Ohio colleges or universities yet, they want people to be aware of what's going on nationwide.

"Don't accept a job that requires you to deposit checks into your own account, or where you would be wiring a portion of money from your account," says FBI spokesperson Todd Lindgren.

Investigators also warn people to read any career offer carefully.

"There might be mispellings or typos or sentences that don't quite make sense on emails and job postings. So look out for that" Lindgren added.

He adds that a student's bank account may be closed due to the alleged fraudulent activity and a report could be filed with police or credit agencies. The student may also be responsible for reimbursing the bank for the money from the counterfeit checks.

Students say while it's disappointing, they're not surprised by what some scam artists try to do.

"Just because we're younger people doesn't mean we have immunity over the scams" said OSU student Hao Wau.

FBI investigators say if you, or someone you know thinks they've been a target, they can file a report with the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center.

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