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Kasich questioning Republican replacement to Obamacare

Governor John Kasich openly questioned whether Trumpcare would be better for Ohio families than Obamacare during a press conference Monday afternoon. (WSYX/WTTE)

Governor John Kasich openly questioned whether Trumpcare would be better for Ohio families than Obamacare during a press conference Monday afternoon.

"With one party trying to jam these things through, you're going to end up with a continued political fight," Kasich said during an event announcing another $1 billion workers' compensation rebate in the Arena District. "I don't think this is good for our state. I've been very outspoken on it and even if I have to go it alone, I'm prepared to do that."

The Republican replacement plan would dramatically scale back federal funding for Obamacare's Medicaid expansion. Kasich said that would hurt Ohio families.

"If you know someone who is mentally ill, drug-addicted or chronically ill, they have to visit the doctor on a regular basis and if their deductible is $10,000-$14,000, how are they going to go?" he said. "Where are they going to get the money for these out -of-pocket expenses?"

Kasich said the plan would also hurt the State of Ohio to the tune of $1 billion to $1.5 billion a year.

"We can't do that," Kasich said. "It's really, really expensive. So there'll be a lot of people that will go without coverage and it won't be good."

The non-profit, non-partisan Center for Community Solutions recently finished a detailed study of Trumpcare and its effect on Ohio. That group found Trumpcare would cause Ohio to lose roughly $20 billion in federal funding from 2019 to 2025.

"There'd be a pretty large shortfall for the state," said Tara Britton with the Center for Community Solutions. "It's not as though we're talking about just people who gained coverage in 2014 when Medicaid expansion came to be. We're talking about other populations who will be impacted by these changes."

Kasich said a family wouldn't be able to afford decent coverage with the tax credits offered in the Republican plan. The tax credits would be based on age instead of income like in Obamacare. Critics said that would lead to less money for low-income families to afford health insurance.

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