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Ohio could be losing its "battleground" status

Ohio is used to being a "battleground state" every four years, but this year Ohio may not choose the eventual winner. (WSYX/WTTE)

Ohio is used to being a "battleground state" every four years, but this year Ohio may not choose the eventual winner.

Donald Trump has led in most of the polls, but Hillary Clinton is leading in enough states where she could win the White House without winning Ohio.

"They don't need to (win Ohio)," said Martha Crone, a political science professor at Columbus State. "I'm sure (Clinton) would like to and it would make a more comfortable victory for Clinton if she was able to win Ohio, but she doesn't have to."

Crone said Ohio also doesn't look like the rest of the country like it once did.

"Ohio is less reflective of the national population than it used to be," she said. "It is older, it is whiter than the rest of the country."

Ohio isn't losing population, but it's not growing as quickly as other states. Ohio lost two Electoral College votes after the last census and could potentially continue to lose clout.

Polling shows many Rust Belt voters who have traditionally voted for Democrats are supporting Trump, but some progressives think that's temporary.

"You have a Republican presidential candidate who has completely bucked his party's stance on things like trade," said Keary McCarthy with the progressive non-profit group Innovation Ohio.

The silver lining to getting less attention to the campaign could be more peace and quiet during campaign season.

"People probably aren't getting quite as many robocalls as they might have done in 2012 or 2008," Crone said.

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